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Georgian Money > Lari Security Features

Lari Security Fearutes


ONE LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

 The Reverse of the Banknote

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – and the Borjgali (a symbol of the sun) is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, lettering and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.

TWO LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

The Reverse of the Banknote

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – and the Borjgali (a symbol of the sun) is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, letterings and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.



FIVE LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

The Reverse of the Banknote

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – and the Borjgali (a symbol of the sun) is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, letterings and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.
13. Foil – a golden foil has a metallic luster peculiarity.
14. Latent image – the denomination numeral “5” becomes visible when tilted to catch the light.

 

TEN LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

The Reverse of the Banknote

 

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – with denomination numeral and the Gryphon is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, letterings and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.
13. Foil – a golden foil has a metallic luster peculiarity.
14. Latent image – the denomination numeral “10” becomes visible when tilted to catch the light.

TWENTY LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

 The Reverse of the Banknote

 SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – with denomination numeral and the Gryphon is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, letterings and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.
13. Foil – a golden foil has a metallic luster peculiarity.
14. Latent image – the denomination numeral “20” becomes visible when tilted to catch the light.


FIFTY LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

The Reverse of the Banknote

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – with denomination numeral and King Tamar’s portrait is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, letterings and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.
13. Iridescent Stripe – a transparent, nacreous multi-colored stripe with the legend “GEL” is placed on the back side of the banknote’s surface.
14. Latent Image – the denomination numeral “50” becomes visible when tilted to catch the light.
15. Hologram – a silver hologram features the Georgian flag. The image changes its color when viewed from different directions.
16. Optical variable stripe – graphic ornaments printed with optical variable ink change their color when tilted to catch the light.

 

ONE HUNDRED LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

 The Reverse of the Banknote

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a light image of the multi-toned lari index – GEL – with denomination numeral and a portrait of Rustaveli is visible on the white stripe of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
3. Vertical security thread – a windowed security thread with the lettering “LARI” can be observed as one continuous dark stripe when holding the banknote up against the light.
4. Micro text – the legend “Georgia” can be read only with the help of a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated fragments of old Georgian architectural ornaments depicted on the front and the back sides of the banknote make a complete pattern when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – thick ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the denomination numeral, letterings and the Borjgali symbol) lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
9. Fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
10. Phosphorescent square – a phosphorescent square on the banknote, with the denomination numeral and the Borjgali symbol in it, becomes visible under UV light.
11. Fluorescent nominal – the denomination numeral on the back side of the banknote becomes yellow under UV light.
12. Infrared light – some part of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.
13. Iridescent Stripe – a transparent, nacreous multi-colored stripe with the legend “GEL” is placed on the back side of the banknote’s surface.
14. Latent Image – the denomination numeral “100” becomes visible when tilted to catch the light.
15. Hologram – a silver hologram features the Georgian flag. The image changes its color when viewed from different directions.
16. Optical variable stripe – graphic ornaments printed with optical variable ink change their color when tilted to catch the light.

TWO HUNDRED LARI

The Obverse of the Banknote

 The Reverse of the Banknote

SECURITY FEATURES

1. Watermark – a multi-toned portrait of Kaikhosro (Kakutsa) Cholokashvili and light images of the lari index – GEL – and the denomination numeral are visible on the white background of the banknote when held up to the light.
2. Vertical security thread – when holding the banknote up against the light, the windowed security thread with the lettering “200 ლარი” integrates. It changes color when viewed from different angles (visible windowed on the back side).
2. Red fibers – positioned in different layers of the paper.
4. Micro Lettering – the inscriptions “საქართველოს ეროვნული ბანკი 200 ლარი”, “საქართველოს ეროვნული ბანკი” and “TWO HUNDRED LARI” are readable only with a magnifying glass.
5. See through register – separated segments of denomination numeral “200” positioned on the front and the back sides of the banknote integrate when held up to the light.
6. Intaglio printing – the layer of ink applied to the graphic elements featured on the front side of the banknote (the portrait, the denomination numeral, letterings), lends a raised surface to the print and is felt when touched.
7. Special security mark for the visually handicapped – dissimilar graphic elements on each denomination have a relief surface that are felt when touched and make it possible to determine the banknote’s denomination.
8. Fit medal – the image of St. George is integrated into the medal with a shiny metallic embossed surface.
9. Look – the lettering “200 ლარი” is realized with laser technology.
10. Serial numbering – printed with fluorescent (on the left side) and magnetic (on the right side) ink.
11. Latent metallic embossed image – the denomination numeral “200” appears on the banknote when viewed from different angles.
12. Iridescent stripe – a transparent, nacreous multi-colored stripe with the legend “200” is placed on the back side of the banknote’s surface.
13. Lead – a vertical silver stripe with the denomination numeral and ornaments on a fluorescent primer base on the front side of the banknote.
14. Optical variable ink – when tilted to catch the light, the image changes color.
15. Invisible fluorescent fibers – green, blue and yellow fluorescent fibers on the banknote become visible under UV light.
16. Infrared light – only a portion of the graphic elements featured on the banknote can be seen under infrared light.
17. Phosphorescent light – the images of the denomination numeral and coat of arms become visible on the banknote under UV light.
18. Fluorescent Nominal – the denomination numerals on the back side of the banknote glow yellow under UV light.
19. Anti-copy background – this is applied to the whole banknote’s surface, it is invisible to the eye and protects the banknote from reproduction using a copy machine.

 

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